"Snafu/ Situation Normal" (SJPCD030)

This double album features two albums recorded by the band in the early 70s. I can remember catching the band at Reading Festival and with a line up including Micky Moody on guitar and Bobby Harrison on vocals, and a sound similar to Lynyrd Skynyrd, success seemed just around the corner. However all the members of Snafu moved on eventually to bigger things and Snafu were just another part of rock 'n' roll history. Maybe, but they were one of only a couple of bands from the UK to challenge that southern States style - and sound convincing. Moody's use of mandolin on "Snafu" enhanced the idea of such a UK based band challenging the mighty Americans and on "Monday Morning" they achieved just that. Hearing Moody and Snafu play in this style would convince even the biggest non-believer that rock was really great fun in the 70s.

..."Situation Normal"...is my favourite with The Allman Brothers and Little Feat becoming heavier influences, those being favourite bands of Harrison. The debut album was actually recorded at the famous Manor at the same time as "Tubular Bells" and (Pete) Solley actually plays on that album briefly. Meanwhile the band toured with The Doobie Brothers and The Eagles, no surprise there, as that was their stage. Solley's control and country influence becomes more apparent the more you listen to "Situation Normal" and as the sleeve notes say, "It makes you either love it or hate it". Songs like "Brown Eyed Beauty & The Blue Assed Fly" helped me to love it.

The hit single though never came and they had to support ELP in the States which turned out to be a total mistake, they simply weren't that sort of band. By the third album, again recorded at The Manor, Solley was missing and for several reasons the band diminshed which was a damned shame. Harrison has attempted to form Snafu more recently but found it impossible as the original band was a unique combination. Never mind there's always this great double album to relive all those great moments.

Martin Hudson, Classic Rock Society


This fine British band's blend of funk/r&b and country influences benefited greatly from the instrumental work of slide guitarist Micky Moody and keyboardist Tim Hinckley...

Kevin Bryan, (January 2004)

"All Funked Up" (SJPCD032)

This short-lived band from the 70s are a welcome addition to the re-releases of recent years...The overall sound was quite American and very rock/funk, although they were always more rock than funk...As usual there are excellent sleeve notes to accompany some great music...

Martin Hudson, Wondrous Stories (February 2000)


...you'll find appearances are deceptive: the laidback country-rock groove sustained throughout has held up remarkably well in the quarter-century since its release...Had it come from an American band, "All Funked Up" would undoubtedly have done better...

Michael Heatley, Classic Rock (April 2000)


"All Funked Up" is Snafu's elusive third album reissued on CD for the first time. The blues debt is evident...while the Billy Gibbons-like overdriven slide adds a touch of Southern boogie to the mixture...

Joel McIver, Record Collector (April 2000)


It's not hard to see why many fans reckon All Funked Up was Snafu's finest ever album.

Jo-Ann Greene, Goldmine (April 2000)


"this 10 tracker has a gritty funky feel that benefits from rich vocal harmonies"

Hartlepool Mail (November 2000)


This fine British band's blend of funk/r&b and country influences benefited greatly from the instrumental work of slide guitarist Micky Moody and keyboardist Tim Hinckley...

Kevin Bryan, (January 2004)